World Book Day

Today has been World Book Day – just in case you have missed it!

The MRC has been as busy as usual but with excitement in the air!

 

guess

The first student arrived at 7.50 am to use their WBD voucher and swap it for one of the WBD books, it seems that less people are trying to use their ‘friends’ vouchers which is good as they are using them for themselves, and although some of the older students were disappointed with the young choice of titles I have chatted to a few P16 students about using the voucher to get £1 off a book in town.

 

 

 

So what else have we been doing?

guess2

Well I tried something new (new to us) with a Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner display/competition – and this has proved to be both popular and head-scratching. I’ll reveal the answers soon!IMG_1136

appWhat has also ‘gone down well’ is the Books Alive App – I’ve demonstrated this free app using my iPad to a chorus of “wows” and “that’s sick” and students were keen to download the App to their own devices.

Sticking with the technology theme I also set 6 WBD puzzles using QR codes and morphed images of the authors of some of the £1 books.

Finally I circulated a book related quiz (on Powerpoint) to all tutors for tomorrow’s DEAR session – but I’ve seen it on some whiteboards already.

wbdThe day is almost over, phew!

Roll on next year!

Advertisements

Interform Winners 2010-2011

Interform Winners 2011 -2012 are C CMay and this week they claimed their prize – by spending £200. on new books.

 

They were a little shy to begin with but soon wanted to choose whole sets of books for the MRC.

 

Included in their selection :- Beast Quest; Sherlock; and Michael Grant books along with plenty of others.

 

Well done everyone!

 

Carnegie Long List – continuing the challenge to read them all….

I’m setting myself the challenge to read all of the books on the long list before the winner is announced. 52 titles in 6 months. That’s 2 a week….. I’d better get reading!

Since my last post I have read….

Sky Hawk by Gill Lewis

I really liked this book, and as my 9 year old is obsessed with bird watching / Springwatch etc I have passed it straight onto him. I am just wait for the wailing when he reaches the sad part in the middle of the book. This saddness isn’t really resolved in the remainder of the story and this is the books downfall. But a good read for all those bird and nature fanatics.

And that’s it I’m done! The announcement of the winner comes out this week – and I dread “Everybody Jam” winning and hope that Patrick Ness walks away with it again with the fantastic “A Monster Calls”. Our Carnegie group will be doing our own vote before the announcment so I’ll report back.

I am really looking forward to next years long list – it made me read some really good and surprisingly really bad books this year, and now I feel kinda lost!

 

 Books I’ve read so far….

      The Language of CatSee full size imageHidden

 

  

   

Carnegie Long List – continuing the challenge to read them all….

I’m setting myself the challenge to read all of the books on the long list before the winner is announced. 52 titles in 6 months. That’s 2 a week….. I’d better get reading!

Since my last post I have read….

 

“The Midnight Zoo” by Sonya Hartnett

A well written book that despite being an ‘easy read’, leaves a sense of “What just happened?” I’m not convinced I’ve worked out what the ending meant for the characters – I have several theories and am a bit disappointed that resolution is so absent. I am looking forward to discussing my theories with my reading groups!

 

 

 

my last one to read is Sky Hawk by Gill Lewis – just as soon as a student returns it to the MRC!

 

 Books I’ve read so far….

      The Language of CatSee full size imageHidden

  

   

Carnegie Long List – continuing the challenge to read them all….

I’m setting myself the challenge to read all of the books on the long list before the winner is announced. 52 titles in 6 months. That’s 2 a week….. I’d better get reading!

Since my last post I have read….

There is No Dog by Meg Rosoff 

Okay so Meg Rosoff had a good idea – “What would happen if God was a teenage boy?” – the answer is this book. I liked the concept – but the execution was lacking, and the ending rushed and unsatisfying. I usually like Meg’s writings but this fell short for me, perhaps my expectations were too high?

 

 

 

HiddenHidden by Miriam Halahmy

Racism, immigration and asylum issues are all covered in this jam-packed book. Alix is walking her dog on the beach when she sees a man being thrown from a boat and being washed up on the shore. An immigrant and a loner from school, Samir, is there too and he persuades her to help hid the stranger. The story goes at a pace addressing and tackling the big issues. A kind of gritty Enid Blyton ‘let’s get the adults out of the way so we can have an’ adventure book – so unbelievable in places – but a good read nevertheless.

 

The Language of CatLanguage of Cat by Rachel Rooney

I loved this book. As the only poetry book on the long list it made a refreshing change. I enjoyed reading them to myself, and reading some aloud to my children. Some of the reminded me of my own poetry, especially those about words and poems and language. Very accessible and a lovely quick read.

 

 

 

 

 Books I’ve read so far….

      See full size image

  

   

Carnegie Long List – continuing the challenge to read them all….

I’m setting myself the challenge to read all of the books on the long list before the winner is announced. 52 titles in 6 months. That’s 2 a week….. I’d better get reading!

Since my last post I have read….

 

See full size imageLife: an Exploded Diagram by Mal Peet

 I found this book to be educational as well as a good read, having never studied the Cuban Missile Crisis, I know that others, who are more familiar with this topic, found some of the ‘history’ parts to be a bit dry. The overall story is fscinating and provides a glimpse into the impact of changes (internal and external) onto one family. A good read. 

 

Treason by Berlie Doherty

This book suffers by comparison. Having read some of the classic historical novels I found this story to be superficial and a poor relation. As a kiddies version it is okay – but younger children might not engage with the plotline and older students would be better off sticking with Plaidy & Gregory etal.

 

Flip by Martyn Bedford

 Flip is about a 14 year old boy called Alex who one morning wakes up in someone else body.It is 6 months since he went to sleep in his own bed and he has to discover who he is using clues from his ‘new’ family and friends. So this strange story continues with Alex/Flip trying to connect with his old life, connect with his new life – and failing to do either of these, and his struggle to understand what has happened and how to reverse it. A bit of a page turner as it is so different and you can’t help wondering what you would do if…., However I found the ending to be unsatisfactory.

 

 Books I’ve read so far….

      

  

   

Carnegie Long List – continuing the challenge to read them all….

I’m setting myself the challenge to read all of the books on the long list before the winner is announced. 52 titles in 6 months. That’s 2 a week….. I’d better get reading!

Since my last post I have read….

 

The Dead of Winter by Chris Priestley

An orphaned boy, picked up and taken to an old large house by a previously unknown/spooky benefactor…… where the story ends with fire and flame…. sounds a bit like another book on this list – Anne Fines The Devil Walks, – which I really liked as the twists in the plot were fresh and different. In The Dead of Winter there is no freshness, cliche after cliche is rolled out – madness, shadows, voices and Micheal remains a 2 dimentional puppet. So – not a graet read then!

Buried Thunder by Tim Bowler

A quick read, with very little explained on the way (or indeed at the end) it is left up to the reader to try and work out waht IS going on alongside Maya. Whilst this is refreshing  and it’s great not to have eveything set out in advance – it does leave some dis-satisfaction. A fairly lightweight book despite its attempts at ‘horror/terror’.

The Memory Cage by Ruth Eastham

Alex’s grandfather is suffereing from altzeimers and so Alex feels it is his responsibility to try and help him to remember and be safe enough to stay in the family home. As he creates a memory book he stirs up the secret history of his grandfather, and his own story (his life in Bosnia). The story pulls all these threads together for a satisfying and liberating ending.

 

Books I’ve read so far….